Research

This is just a partial listing of my research projects and is presented as follows: (1) works in progress, (2) books and book chapters, (3) papers about Bayes, (4) papers about Coase, (5) papers about constitutional law, (6) research papers posted on arXiv, (7) research papers posted on SSRN, (8) reviews, and (9) shorter works. (Updated: December of 2020.)

WORKS IN PROGRESS

  • Adam Smith in Love (under review, Econ Journal Watch)
  • Breaking Bad Promises (in progress)
  • Teaching Tiger King (forthcoming, St Louis University Law Journal)

BOOKS AND BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Business Law & Strategy, with Sean Melvin and David Orozco (McGraw Hill, 1st ed., in press).
  • Buy or Bite?, in Glen Whitman & James Dow, editors, Economics of the Undead (Rowman & Littlefield, 2014), pp. 123-129. (This book is available here; my chapter “Buy or Bite” was featured on Freakonomics Radio.)
  • El ajedrez in Blade Runner: lecciones de la Partida Inmortal, in Daniel Nina, editor, Blade Runner: memoria, vigilancia y el sujeto desechable, Ediciones Callejón (2008), pp. 105-130. (This book is available here.)

PAPERS ABOUT BAYES’ THEOREM AND “BAYESIAN VOTING”

PAPERS ABOUT THE COASE THEOREM

PAPERS ABOUT CONSTITUTIONAL LAW, HISTORY, AND THEORY

PAPERS POSTED ON “ArXiv”

PAPERS POSTED ON SSRN

  • See my SSRN homepage here.

REVIEWS

SHORTER WORKS

Image Credit: Giovanni Parmigiani.

5 Responses to Research

  1. enrique says:

    Enrique will post more of his papers in the coming weeks …

  2. Jonathan O'Donnell says:

    Hi Enrique

    When you crowdfund the Litigation Game boardgame, let me know. I’d fund that. 🙂

    Thanks for subscribing to The Research Whisperer.

    Jonathan

  3. Eva Graham says:

    Hello Professor
    I was drawn to your work The Parable of the Prisoners because of my interest in cooperation among litigating parties. Your piece was insightful and worthy of praise for its historical context, and despite some complexities in the subject matter, you were able to provide an easy to understand format to grasp the far-reaching tentacles of the “Parable of the Prisoners” model.

    I’m looking forward to reading more of your upcoming posts.

    Eva

    • enrique says:

      Thanks Eva! I see civil and criminal litigation as a “war of attrition” or “mixed-motive game” (to borrow Thomas Schelling’s term) in which, although the economic interests of the opposing parties are in conflict, there is a lot of room for cooperation.

  4. Pingback: Was Holmes a Bayesian? | prior probability

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