Category Archives: Uncategorized

The costs of quadratic voting

I explained how quadratic voting works in my previous post, where I presented a simple quadratic voting procedure in which voters are allocated an equal number of “vote credits” before going to the polls. Yet, whenever we are evaluating a … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Quadratic voting 101

We stipulated in our previous post how beliefs and preferences can come in degrees. I also mentioned how this simple insight has radical implications for any domain in which voting is used to make collective decisions. Why? Because the various … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Before Ramsey; After Ramsey

I mentioned in my previous post that Frank Ramsey was one of the founding fathers of the subjective interpretation of probability, and I also noted how Ramsey’s approach forever changed my view of the world. Before Ramsey (BR), I used … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

A sheer excess of powers

That is the subtitle of Cheryl Misak’s intellectual biography of the great British polymath Frank Ramsey, who was born on this day (22 February 1903) twelve decades ago. Among many other things, Ramsey was one of the founders of the … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

In praise of chalk and blackboards

Check out this beautiful 26-page paper on “Chalk: Materials and Concepts in Mathematics Research” by Michael Barany and Donald MacKenzie. According to one of the authors of the chalk paper (Barany), one of the advantages of blackboards is that they … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Kant on Evidence?

Nine years ago (2011), Chief Justice John Roberts (pictured below, left) presented this devastating critique of legal scholarship. Among other things, the Chief made this wisecrack: “Pick up a copy of any law review that you see, and the first … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Bayesian Judges

That is the title of my most recent contribution to the literature on judicial voting, a literature that goes back to Frank Easterbrook’s excellent paper “Ways of criticizing the court,” which was published in The Harvard Law Review in 1982. … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment