Reflections (part 2 of n)

I talked about my college years at UCSB in my previous “reflection”; today, I will talk about my Yale Law School years (1990 to 1993). Beyond the wonderful friendships I made during my three years of law school, several highlights stand out in my mind: (1) reading “The Problem of Social Cost” and being exposed to the “Coase theorem” for the first time in Guido Calabresi’s torts class; (2) finding out that most private property in the world is held in common (I discovered this fact while I was editing a large chunk of Bob Ellickson’s “Property in Land” law review article for Volume 102 of the Yale Law Journal); and (3) attending, along with a small handful of other Yalies, a Herbie Hancock concert as well as a guest lecture by the great Mexican writer and thinker Octavio Paz. (I had previously written my senior honors thesis in Spanish about one of Paz’s works.) In addition to these intellectual and cultural experiences, I twice had the privilege of being one of Steven M. Gillon’s teaching assistants for his survey U.S. history course. As part of my duties, I attended all of Professor Gillon’s excellent lectures and led two discussion sections every week. More importantly, that’s when I knew for sure that I wanted to become a college professor myself!

Mapping Yale, Part Two | Y Design

About F. E. Guerra-Pujol

When I’m not blogging, I am a business law professor at the University of Central Florida.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Reflections (part 2 of n)

  1. Herbie Hancock concert, nice!! + 500!

Leave a Reply to F. E. Guerra-Pujol Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s