Hacking and Sources of Law

I will resume my analysis of Jack Balkin’s social media regulation paper in my next post; in the meantime, check out my most recent lecture on the now-infamous Face-Mash Incident, which occurred in the fall of 2003 when college sophomore Mark Zuckerberg hacked the computer databases of Harvard College and launched a controversial but popular website called “Face-Mash”. Although Face-Mash was short-lived (it was taken down after a few hours), the website literally went viral at a time when there were no iPhones, no Twitter, no YouTube. But was Face-Mash a crime, a civil wrong, a moral lapse, or just a harmless prank? In this lecture, I will address this question by surveying the main sources of law that apply to computer hacking.

About F. E. Guerra-Pujol

When I’m not blogging, I am a business law professor at the University of Central Florida.
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