Category Archives: Logical Fallacies

Larry’s fallacy

Note: this is the first in a series of five blog posts responding to Larry Solum’s defense of public meaning originalism. Our friend and colleague Larry Solum, a law professor at Georgetown, recently wrote this statement on behalf of Neil … Continue reading

Posted in Bayesian Reasoning, History, Law, Logical Fallacies, Politics | 6 Comments

Additional critique of Baude and Sachs

We mentioned previously that our colleagues Will Baude (University of Chicago) and Stephen Sachs (Duke University) posted to SSRN a fascinating paper titled “The Law of Interpretation” to be published in the Harvard Law Review early next year. In their … Continue reading

Posted in Law, Logical Fallacies | Leave a comment

Is stare decisis a tautology?

Stare decisis, or the principle of binding precedent, means that a decision made by a court is binding on that court itself in future cases and on all inferior courts in the same legal jurisdiction. The rationale for this principle is the … Continue reading

Posted in Law, Logical Fallacies, Paradoxes | 3 Comments

The law of the law of the law of interpretation?

As we mentioned in our previous blog post, William Baude and Stephen Sach recently posted on SSRN an 85-page magnum opus titled “The Law of Interpretation.” (By the way, on the bottom of each page of their article, there is an … Continue reading

Posted in Law, Logical Fallacies, Philosophy | Leave a comment

The law of the law of interpretation

William Baude (University of Chicago) and Stephen E. Sachs (Duke University) recently posted on SSRN an important paper titled “The Law of Interpretation.” (How important? Their paper will be published in the Harvard Law Review–that important!) Law professors like Baude and … Continue reading

Posted in Law, Logical Fallacies, Philosophy | 8 Comments

Visualization of the “lucky fool syndrome”

Read the full essay by Carl Richards describing the “Lucky Fool Syndrome” (or self-attribution bias) here.

Posted in Deception, Logical Fallacies | Leave a comment

Cause or effect?

Posted in Culture, Logical Fallacies | Leave a comment