Category Archives: Economics

Class No. 9 (meet the interns)

Welcome back from Spring Break! For our next class, we’re going to go back in time, back to the summer of ’04. That’s when Mark Zuckerberg relocated his new company to Northern California and brought along Facebook’s first two interns, … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Ethics, Law | Leave a comment

The superfluous legal doctrine of consideration?

Note: This is the third of a series of blog posts in which we review Nate Oman’s new book The Dignity of Commerce: Markets and the Moral Foundation of Contract Law. As we mentioned in a previous post, Part I … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Ethics, Law, Literature | 2 Comments

Morality distribution channels

Note: This is the second of several blog posts in which we review The Dignity of Commerce: Markets and the Moral Foundation of Contract Law, by Nathan B. Oman. In our previous post, we introduced Nate Oman’s book on “The … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Ethics, Law | 1 Comment

Markets and morality (part 1)

Note: This is the first of six blog posts in which we review Nathan B. Oman’s book The Dignity of Commerce: Markets and the Moral Foundation of Contract Law, University of Chicago Press (2016). Nate Oman begins his beautiful book … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Ethics, Law | 1 Comment

Spring break reading list

Here is what we are reading over our spring break: 1. Peter Thiel (with Blake Masters), Zero to one: notes on startups, or how to build the future. We teach business law and are currently writing several chapters of a … Continue reading

Posted in Academia, Bayesian Reasoning, Economics, Ethics, Law | 2 Comments

Taxing robots (Pigovian beard tax edition)

Microsoft billionaire and quasi-monopolist Bill Gates recently proposed that we should tax robots. But should we really tax robots? Why not impose a tax on every line of computer code instead? Or why not tax computer programmers who sport beards? … Continue reading

Posted in Current Affairs, Economics, Politics, Web/Tech | Leave a comment

The End of Risk-Taking?

Our friend and colleague Tyler Cowen has just published a new book with a catchy title: The Complacent Class. At the risk of over generalization (pun intended), Professor Cowen’s book claims that North Americans are becoming intellectually lazy and spiritually complacent–more … Continue reading

Posted in Bayesian Reasoning, Economics, History | 2 Comments